Posts Tagged ‘art’

Wheels of Life – First Friday May

April 10, 2016

wheels - 1 - blog

First Friday, May 6
Artist Reception: 6-8 p.m.

“Wheels of Life” includes the work of two artists: June Glenn and Brescia Rose. They will be showcasing contemporary street photography centered on the current cultures of skateboarding and vintage cars in Santa Cruz County.

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First Friday, March 4

February 27, 2016

Enmesh

PicMonkey Collage

Artist Reception: Friday, March 4 – 6-8 p.m.

Monica Calsbeek and Summer Stiegman both grew up in San Diego, California without acquaintance. Serendipitously, they both attended the university in Santa Cruz in the fall of 2012. Since then, they developed an artistic, feminine, and personal relationship in which they influence one another both materially and ideally.  Enmesh is a photographic series where the human form and inanimate materials create a dialogue. The subject matter of the photographs are female bodies interacting with textiles. Ranging from natural landscapes to studio lighting, Enmesh explores photographic techniques by means of experimental digital alterations. The layering process suggests that relationships with the self and objects are bound to be multifaceted and tangled.

First Friday: Emerson Murray: Shadows on the Wall

December 12, 2015

We are kicking off 2016 with an amazing new First Friday artist.

Emerson Murray: Shadows on the Wall

Artist Statement:
Painting is an emotional endeavor for me. Each piece is a distillation of a story, a theme, or a myth, boiled down to an emotional experience. Whether or not the viewer understands my meaning is irrelevant, as long as the viewer feels something, anything. I paint figures, abstracted into form and color set in abstract landscapes. The figures do not occupy the space volumetrically and light and shadow are generally not part of my tool set. I work in both acrylic and oil paint, the oil paint I mix from raw pigment in order to create my own colors. I generally work with a palette knife and my hands. I oftentimes throw and drip paint onto the canvas. The colors are selected on demand, I do not work from a predetermined palette of colors, but mix the colors as I paint, sometimes mixing colors right on the canvas. I am a disciplined painter and show up for work every day. I may stare at a work in progress for nights on end, but I am in the studio working.

emersonmurray.com

June First Friday – Maddie Amelia Lewis: Dreamscaping

May 16, 2015

Skulls and Bottles

Artist Reception: Friday, June 5 – 6-8 p.m.

Bio: Maddie Amelia Lewis is a 2D artist with a fondness for acrylic paint and ink. She is a recent graduate from UC Santa Cruz. She is fascinated by fantasy, the arts, and textures.

Paintings will be on sale from $20-$85, and lithographic prints will be selling from $5-$15. See artist website for preliminary prices: www.noxkitarts.com

Artist Statement:

I like making huge gestural brush strokes, circular voids reminiscent of black holes, drips, and fine lines. I paint abstracted landscapes and attempt to embody concepts like death, anxiety, love, daydreams, and imaginary places. I will go through great lengths to actualize an idea. I try to draw from the beauty and emotion in my life for my art so I can’t forget it. Each of my pieces is a space I create to reflect, and after I take my time with each one, I let it go.As an acrylic painter, I am a texture junkie. I love acrylic mediums—glass beads, resin sand, modeling paste, black lava—I’ve tried them all and I make full use of them. My paintings ensure dynamic and varied surfaces. I tend to work very quickly and use a lot of aggressive mark-making techniques. The larger the canvas, the more energetic I become while I paint it. For small works, I can be more delicate, but the restlessness remains.  They say that drawing from live models gives the drawing itself more life, so I try to instill the energy, emotion, and intensity into my paintings by embodying those feelings as I paint.In the end, it all comes down to an obsession. I paint because I can never get paintings out of my head. A painting will tell me what it needs to be real, and I oblige it the best I can. It’s a piece of the world inside of me—it has always been, and will never cease to be.

First Friday – April 2015

March 14, 2015

First Friday is finally back at SCRS and we’ve got an amazing artist lined up for April.

Janina A. Larenas: Graphic Works on Paper
A collection of design projects ranging from posters to hand printed sticker images to original book illustrations.

Artist Bio: Janina A. Larenas studied printmaking and book arts at the University of California Santa Cruz. Besides design her skills include relief, intaglio and letterpress printing, as well as painting, embroidery, bookmaking and food preserving. Her designs are most recognizable as hand printed printed stickers and as t-shirts for The Devil Makes Three.

The show is available to view during normal studio hours. Check schedule here. If a band is booked, then the studio is open.

Do You Know Gail Rich?

January 21, 2015

Capture

Every year the Santa Cruz  Arts Council Associates puts on the Gail Rich Awards at the Rio Theatre. You’ve probably never been, but I think yo u should go. Here are my top 10 reasons to go to your first Gail Rich Awards next Wednesday, Jan. 28.

  1. It’s a awards show that celebrates the spirit of the arts in Santa Cruz by formally recognizing, “our friends and neighbors who are committed to living lives of artistic passion.
  2. You will be way more inspired than usual on a Wednesday night.
  3. It will give you that feeling of community that you forget you love until you experience it again and then remember it is why you live in an artistic community in the first place.
  4. There will be live music.
  5. It’s free.
  6. You will hear stuff like this (quote from honoree Robbie Schoen): “I want to do what art is supposed to do,” Schoen said. “I want it to stop people in their tracks and give us pause to reflect on our place in the world as human beings. It’s here to remind us of the things that matter and take us away from our day-to-day lives.”
  7. Excellent networking, especially if you like the artist types.
  8. There is often wine.
  9. You pay a lot of money to live in a town that has really cool shit like this, but if you don’t go out and support it, it goes away.
  10. There are always free cookies.

I really hope I see you there.

19th Annual Gail Rich Awards
January 28th, 2015 at 7:30pm
Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave. in Santa Cruz
FREE and open to the public

2015 honorees:

Carolyn Hyatt – arts philanthropist
Dale Ockerman – White Album Ensemble, Musicscool
Robbie Schoen – Felix Kulpa Gallery
Johnny Simmons – KUSP radio personality
Cat Willis – Tannery World Dance and Cultural Center

Krusch Rhoades

May 28, 2014

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First Friday – June 6
Krusch Rhoades

Available to view for the month of June anytime the studio is open.  pillars of my existence,” said Rhoades.

Krusch Rhoades, 33, spent the formative years of his youth in the “armpit of New York, the shoulders of New England and on the polluted teat of New Jersey.”

Since then, Rhoades has travelled all over the country, and currently calls Santa Cruz his home. He has painted, drawn, molded, and scrawled for as long as he can remember.

“Identifying myself as an “artist” at an early age somehow allowed me to view life with a golden preciousness. Being enraptured with the architecture of simplicity, the constant dance of light. I’m so thankful for this perspective,” said Rhoades.

Rhoades enjoys large scale work, especially when working with spray paint, which he calls the “closest synthesis of dance and paint.”

“The large sweeping strokes is so pleasurable when compared to the restricted movements of smaller pieces,” said Rhoades.

That being said, the artist produces work of all scales regularly, and even paints bicycle frames.

“Paint and bicycles have been the most consistent relationships in my life and have therefore becomes the pillars of my existence,” said Rhoades.

April Art

April 3, 2014

Frist Friday April

Photographs by Melanya Hamasyan
Available to view for the month of April anytime the studio is open.

Transitory Frames – Dehistoricized Spaces 

These set of captured video frames are taken from a discourse among people of the Armenian descent, whose ancestors have immigrated to the United States as a direct result of the Armenian Genocide.  They speak of the forgotten cities, villages, and churches of their ancestors.  They speak of fear and loss of identity along with the  loss  of  ancient  cultural  and  historical  spaces.  Although  the  tragedy  of  the physical genocide has ceased, cultural genocide is still being carried out.  In current eastern Turkey (historic Armenia), places are recontextualized to exclude Armenian historical  presence.  Ancient  Armenian  monuments  and  churches  are  being destroyed or appropriated  as  barns and geographical spaces are renamed.  As a result, ancestral spaces are dehistoricized and people uprooted.

Artist Summary

My work often involves cultural and social issues which I explore in photography, video, performance, and multi­media sculpture. These often take the form of installation or socially engaging art. Whether social, historical or literary, research is an integral part of my process as it provides a framework for the final product.  In the past I’ve studied Armenian folklore in photography. I’ve created dialogue in visual poetry using voice, movement, and space within the medium of digital video. Recently I’ve begun to explore dehistoricized spaces and cultural genocide in multimedia. In all my projects, the chosen theme is one that I am personally attached
to but also one that is often a question due for research. Hence, my work isn’t purely documental, as it also enters a very personal realm. Within this realm, there is a strong presence of an intimate act of the hand, whether in the form of calligraphy on bread, puppetry or photographic composition. This in turn creates an intimation of my presence, suggesting a very personal relationship to the question at hand.

 

First Friday March

February 13, 2014

First Friday, March 7
Dream Scapes:Fleeting Lines From the Human Consciousness Paintings by Whitney Romberg
Available to view for the month of March anytime the studio is open.

Artist Statement: From a young age, I have always been fascinated by the concept of dreams within the human brain. Within these paintings, I strive to explore the tangibility of dream scapes using color, texture, and symbolism to illustrate the vagueness that our conscience is capable of making, expressing our deepest thoughts that our rational mind isolates during waking.

First Friday, June 7 – Sara True

May 29, 2013

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Don’t bleed so loud, I can’t hear the TV

Artist Reception: 6-9 PM

artist statement:

Shadows are revealed in my paintings through humorous abstract narratives, featuring pop culture symbolisms of femininity. In “Dear Jimmy America”, a darkly intimate poem is paired with a comically painterly bra, while “The Great Mother Tit of America” depicts a red-and-white-striped breast lactating ice cream.

In “fun fair i-iii” I explore subtle emotive energies through gestural expressions of vibrant color. Triangular and pentagonal pieces of wood are painted with quick, intuitive movements of wrist and finger. Impressions of vegetal and organic forms emerge, but, like clouds, patterns continue to shift, leaving definition open to viewers’ imaginations.